Notes on Napkins

musings for songwriters


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My Coach Rocks!

In addition to our live audio/video feedback courses, SongU members have the opportunity to forge a creative relationship with any of award-winning coaches who offer individual written feedback on songs in progress and sometimes award them with “Best of SongU”! Emphasis is given to constructive comments on lyrics, music, originality, and commercial potential.

Today’s spotlight is on Coach #1683 (aka Lisa Palas)!

“Thank you for the terrific, inspiring feedback. It felt good to hear that coming from you. I will address the tweaks you pointed out and kick it out of the nest. Thanks ever so much again.” -Mark M. IN

“Your advice is just what I what I’m looking for.Thanks so much…I’ll be back!”Grahame M., FL

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Lisa Palas

About: Lisa is an award-winning songwriter with several number one hits to her credit including Alabama’s “You’ve Got the Touch” and “There’s No Way”. Her songs have been recorded by the renowned country stars Alabama, Reba McEntire, Randy Travis, Kris Kristofferson, Chris LeDoux, Conway Twitty and The Oak Ridge Boys as well as included in the soundtracks of feature films. She has also scored musicals on the stage, most recently “Jack” for Louisville’s Walden Theater. A featured soloist at Unity churches, Lisa recently recorded a CD of original songs included in her performances. As an actress, Lisa has appeared in numerous short films, industrials, TV commercials and episodic television such as the Pax Network’s “It’s a Miracle”, hosted by Richard Thomas. She has also performed in various productions on the Nashville stage including the world premiere of “A Stoop on Orchard Street.”

Coaching Philosophy: “I try to coach you as if you were a staff writer for my company.”

Thank you, Coach, for offering professional advice and songwriting education to literally hundreds of SongU writers since 2006! You rock!


Write Your Truth

Last week I watched an email exchange between Danny ArenaCo-Founder of SongU.com, and a fellow songwriter. The focus was not just about writing songs but about how we can listen to each other and have honest conversations about difficult subjects. I asked him if he could take a portion of that email and modify it into an article that might be of interest to our readers. Here it is:

One only needs to glance at any news organization’s social media page to see the current state of divisiveness in the world. We choose our sides. We engage in hostile micro-tweets. We post snarky memes and comebacks. As quickly as our fingers can type, we rattle off hurtful labels and insults like “libtard” and “trumptard,” “commie” and “nazi.” We cease listening to each other and stop talking to each other. We use our words as weapons to further drive a wedge between “us” and “them.”

While our choice of words can be used to divide us, they can also unite. As songwriters, this notion of unity should align with us. After all, at the very core of the craft of songwriting lies the principle of universality. Even the words unify, unity, universal all originate from the same Latin word, “uni,” meaning oneness. Who hasn’t been to a music industry seminar and heard some publisher or executive recite the mantra — a successful song must strike a universal chord? Part of our creative job is to find a way to express a single idea that resonates with an audience. This sounds much simpler to do in practice. Song after song by aspiring writers gets passed over because it fails to “ring true” to a broader audience.

At SongU.com, one of our courses teaches us that the most effective way to reach the universal is through the specific – a story that you can tell using your own truth. What does this mean? I know that I can never fully comprehend what it’s like to walk through this world as an African American male. No matter how “woke” I become, I will never know the enormous weight someone carries throughout life simply because of the color of their skin. This does not mean that I do not understand prejudice or hate. It means that for me to write about the subject in an honest way that resonates with others, I must find my own truth and then tell that story.

So what is my truth? I understand religious hate — my wife is Jewish, and I have lived with antisemitism and watched it through her eyes. This past weekend, the Holocaust Memorial at our local JCC was vandalized with nazi symbols and white supremacist threats. I also understand homophobia and hate — my sister is gay, and I have lived through times where “neighbors” put letters in her mailbox, telling her to move out of the neighborhood simply because of who she chooses to love. While I am not Black or Hispanic, I understand what it means to judge someone by the color of their skin. Sara and I adopted our daughter at birth from Guatemala. Every day, I see the world through her eyes. I know the pain it caused when her history teacher walked up to her desk while conducting a lesson on citizenship, asking her if she was born in the United States. Upon answering no, her teacher proceeded to tell her in front of the entire class that she better have a conversation with her parents that evening because she might be in this country illegally. I know the truth of what it feels like to have the police called on my daughter’s boyfriend for playing soccer at dusk with a few of his Latino friends because someone thought they “looked suspicious.”

How can I channel my truth into my creative process? If I’m inspired to write a song about Black Lives Matter because I am outraged by the injustice I see, I cannot write the same song as LL Cool J or Trey Songz. There is no possible way I can approach the topic of injustice from the same honest perspective they did because that is not my truth. No matter how much I admire or attempt to emulate their approach, it will not ring true or have the universal appeal of their messages.

I need to write my own truth. I can write an honest song about having a daughter who’s judged every day because of her skin color or how we worry she and her boyfriend could get pulled over at night when he’s driving. Or I can change direction and write an honest song about what it’s like to love someone who is hated simply because of which religion they follow or gender of who they choose to love. The point is that if I do my job well as a songwriter using my truth as a vehicle, I will wind up with a song that makes an impact and resonates. That means more listeners are likely to hear my song and identify with its core message.

Recognizing your truth and being able to tap into it creatively, in an honest way, will make your songs more universal. And it seems to me, the world could use a little more “uni” right now. So use your voice and speak your truth. Your songs and this world will be a much better place for it.

Stay the course and keep the faith.

-Danny